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Protection and Self-Reliance

Protection and Self-Reliance

Enabling dignity in urban displacement

Refugees are among the most vulnerable civilians in the Middle East. Many have fled overcrowded camps for urban centers in the hopes of earning a better life for their loved ones. Yet, too often they lack the training, civil documentation, and support needed to access decent work, housing, and public services. It can be a daily struggle to avoid housing eviction and hunger. In these situations, children are at greater risk of early marriage, child labor, and years of missed schooling. Sexual and gender-based violence and workplace exploitation continue to affect the least protected.

The eligibility criteria and application periods for temporary protection IDs in Turkey and birth registration in Lebanon have changed over time. Without these documents, Syrian refugees have difficulty accessing education, health care, and work. Other sought-after documents include: marriage certificates, residency permits, degree equivalency, and work permits.

In parts of Syria, children are poorly protected from aerial bombardment and shelling. Many have witnessed their parents and friends become casualties of the war. Such trauma is more than a child should ever have to endure. The recent surge in displacement in Northwest Syria and the threat of COVID-19 has resulted in further isolation. Many aid actors have had to suspend psychosocial support programs that provide tremendous emotional support to the young.

RPI and its local implementing partners work to meet these needs by:

  • Providing Syrian refugees in Turkey with guidance on documentation procedures and referrals to service providers to legitimize and support their stay
  • Providing individual case management to the most vulnerable refugees: interpretation/translation, accompaniment to service providers, and support with completing application forms
  • Counseling and financially aiding Syrian refugees in Lebanon to complete birth registration
  • Providing pediatric psychosocial support and referrals to psychologists in besieged areas of Syria
  • Supporting the income-generation capacity of female-headed refugee households and victims of violence
  • Providing transitional housing, protection, and other social support to vulnerable refugee women and children
  • Encouraging collaboration among our local partners and other nonprofit, private sector, and municipal stakeholders
  • Planning for post-conflict information and counseling on housing, land, and property restitution and reparation

  • Counseling and Case Management

    6,715 Syrians in Turkey received consultations on how to access vital documentation and medical, legal, relief, and educational services. 220 Syrian refugees in Lebanon were supported with birth registration.


  • Supporting Mental Health

    In Syria, our partner provided 190 children and trainers with psychosocial programming.


  • Strengthening Livelihoods that Give Back

    In Syria, 678 persons benefited from goods or services provided by 59 women trained in first aid, nursing, psychosocial support, sewing, and use of dried olive pulp as heating fuel. 136 refugee teachers in Lebanon received training, 83 of which also received classroom materials. 647 civilians in Syria received winter clothing.




RPI’s partner Basmeh and Zeitooneh assisting Syrian refugees with documentation needs in Sanliurfa, Turkey.

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